Advent, Life, and Death

Advent is at once about life and death. It’s about life in that we celebrate the first advent of Christ into the world. Indeed, the eternal Word–the One who is the way, and the truth, and the life–took on flesh and dwelled among us (Cf., John 1:14; 14:6).

But the first advent of Christ also implies death–the death of us. This is what Jesus meant when he said in Luke 9:23-24, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will save it.” Jesus says, in effect, that the one who follows him will die to self daily. In other words, our priorities, agendas, calendars, and concerns are to be in accord with Christ’s.

This is how the apostle Paul understood the Christian life: “I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me” (Galatians 2:20). Paul’s understanding of what happened to him on that fateful day on the road to Damascus was nothing less than death–death to self and his sinful pattern of existence. And it was a death that needed to be allocated daily which is why Paul declared to the Corinthians, “I die daily” (1 Corinthians 15:31).

This death, however, was not an end in itself. Paul died to self so that he might live to God in Christ Jesus. We are called, after all, to be a living sacrifice (Cf., Romans 6:11; 12:1).

All of this could be summed up by the simple yet profound statement made by John the Baptist at the close of his earthly ministry and the dawn of Christ’s, “He must increase, but I must decrease” (John 3:30). And this is my prayer for Immanuel this Advent season: that we would shine brightly as we collectively live for the increase of Christ.

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